Good day everybody! I hope it is going well for you all. Well I have a treadmill tip for you guys today and this one is about different treadmill workouts and how awesome they are!

So a lot of people don’t realize that you can do more with a treadmill than just get on it and move; maybe even speed it up once in a while; you know, to shake things up a bit. The thing is, you can do virtually anything on a treadmill that you can do outside on the streets. Treadmills even carry added perks like being able to take full control of your run by adjusting the speed whenever you want, and increasing the incline whenever you want. Almost every treadmill will come with some pre-programmed workouts. These workouts will usually be focused on specific running goals like training for a 5k, 10k, half-marathon, marathon, so on and so forth. There are even some focused on goals other than races, like burning the most calories to lose weight. They may even have some in an interval fashion like sprinting for a specific amount of time, then walking, and then sprinting again or something like that. Just make sure you read Treadmill Reviews.com to see which treadmills have the programs you like. What some workouts will also do is automatically control the incline for you so that it shakes up your workout a little bit. If you don’t like the pre-programmed workouts that these treadmills provide, you can obviously use your own and adjust the treadmill’s settings as you go. Here are some ideas for different types of workouts and training that you can do on a treadmill.

5k Training

So this is a 5k, 3.1 mile, training schedule that has all of your workouts planned out for you. It is for people who are moderately active, like they exercise at least twice a week. It is a four-week routine. Note, this routine is not for people who are totally inactive; there are other programs that you should start first to get yourself in a state where you will be able to run a 5k. Okay, here is the four-week training schedule for a 5k:

Week 1:

Day 1: Run 10 minutes, walk 1 min – 2x
Day 2: Rest
Day 3: Run 12 minutes, walk 1 min – 2x
Day 4: Rest
Day 5: Run 13 minutes, walk 1 min – 2x
Day 6: Do some type of cross-training
Day 7: Rest

Week 2:

Day 1: Run 15 minutes, walk 1 min – 2x
Day 2: Rest
Day 3: Run 17 minutes, walk 1 min, run 7 min
Day 4: Rest
Day 5: Run 19 minutes, walk 1 min, run 7 min
Day 6: Do some type of cross-training
Day 7: Rest

Week 3:

Day 1: Run 20 minutes, walk 1 min, run 6 min
Day 2: Rest
Day 3: Run for a full 24 minutes
Day 4: Rest
Day 5: Run for a full 26 minutes
Day 6: Do some type of cross-training
Day 7: Rest

Week 4:

Day 1: Run for a full 28 minutes
Day 2: Rest
Day 3: Run for a full 30 minutes
Day 4: Rest
Day 5: Run for a full 20 minutes
Day 6: Rest
Day 7: Race Day

10k Training

A 10k, as you can imagine, is double the length of a 5k, so a 10k is 6.2 miles. This one is going to take a little more preparation than the 5k; so this one is an eight-week training schedule. Of course you are going to need to be pretty active to perform on this kind of level, it is wise to start out with smaller races like a 5k. Here it is.

Week 1:

Day 1: Rest
Day 2: 1.5 Mile run
Day 3: Either Rest or Cross-train
Day 4: 1.5 Mile run
Day 5: Rest
Day 6: 2 Mile run
Day 7: Easy 25-30 minute run

Week 2:

Day 1: Rest
Day 2: 2 Mile run
Day 3: Either Rest or Cross-train
Day 4: 2 Mile run
Day 5: Rest
Day 6: 2.5 Mile run
Day 7: Easy 25-30 minute run

Week 3:

Day 1: Rest
Day 2: 2.5 Mile run
Day 3: Either Rest or Cross-train
Day 4: 2 Mile run
Day 5: Rest
Day 6: 3.5 Mile run
Day 7: Easy 30-35 minute run

Week 4:

Day 1: Rest
Day 2: 2.5 Mile run
Day 3: Either Rest or Cross-train
Day 4: 2 Mile run
Day 5: Rest
Day 6: 3.5 Mile run
Day 7: Easy 35 minute run

Week 5:

Day 1: Rest
Day 2: 3 Mile run
Day 3: Either Rest or Cross-train
Day 4: 2 Mile run
Day 5: Rest
Day 6: 3.5 Mile run
Day 7: Easy 35-40 minute run

Week 6:

Day 1: Rest
Day 2: 3 Mile run
Day 3: Cross-train
Day 4: 2 Mile run
Day 5: Rest
Day 6: 3.5 Mile run
Day 7: Easy 35-40 minute run

Week 7:

Day 1: Rest
Day 2: 3.5 Mile run
Day 3: Cross-train
Day 4: 3 Mile run
Day 5: Rest
Day 6: 5 Mile run
Day 7: Easy 40 minute run

Week 8:

Day 1: Rest
Day 2: 3 Mile run
Day 3: Cross-train or Rest
Day 4: 2 Mile run
Day 5: Rest
Day 6: Rest
Day 7: Race Day

Also of note, cross-training means doing an exercise that will, in some way or another, help you prepare towards your race; it’s not just doing another exercise. So if you are trying to build muscle by lifting weights for your cross-train day, you aren’t following the schedule correctly!

Well there you have it, those are some pretty basic training schedules for a 10k and a 5k. I hope you noticed how simple these workouts are and that you can do them on a treadmill. If you decide to do one of these, good luck!